Dr PennyStock Free Forums
January 22, 2018, 10:53:21 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Indicators that I use on my chart template  (Read 4676 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Dr PennyStock
Administrator
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 26758



WWW
« on: January 12, 2016, 02:17:46 PM »

Volume is my main indicator, it accounts for about 90% of my Technical Analysis, just to give you an idea about how important it is.

This is the definition, taken from here: http://stockcharts.com/school/doku.php?id=chart_school:glossary_v

Volume - The number of trades in a security over a period of time. On a chart, volume is usually represented as a histogram (vertical bars) below the price chart. The NYSE and Nasdaq measure volume differently. For every buyer, there is a seller: 100 shares bought = 100 shares sold. The NYSE would count this as one trade and as 100 shares of volume. However, the Nasdaq would count each side of the trade and as 200 shares volume.
Logged

Dr PennyStock
Dr PennyStock
Administrator
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 26758



WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2016, 06:24:48 PM »

MACD - Another indicator that makes part of my chart template, below a very detailed work about it:

http://stockcharts.com/school/doku.php?id=chart_school:technical_indicators:moving_average_convergence_divergence_macd

MACD - (Moving Average Convergence/Divergence) - An indicator developed by Gerald Appel that is calculated by subtracting the 26-period exponential moving average of a given security from its 12-period exponential moving average. By comparing moving averages, MACD displays trend following characteristics, and by plotting the difference of the moving averages as an oscillator, MACD displays momentum characteristics.

The Moving Average Convergence/Divergence oscillator (MACD) is one of the simplest and most effective momentum indicators available. The MACD turns two trend-following indicators, moving averages, into a momentum oscillator by subtracting the longer moving average from the shorter moving average. As a result, the MACD offers the best of both worlds: trend following and momentum. The MACD fluctuates above and below the zero line as the moving averages converge, cross and diverge. Traders can look for signal line crossovers, centerline crossovers and divergences to generate signals. Because the MACD is unbounded, it is not particularly useful for identifying overbought and oversold levels.
Logged

Dr PennyStock
Dr PennyStock
Administrator
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 26758



WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2016, 12:39:47 PM »

RSI - Relative Strength Index, very good indicator I use it to know where a stock will support or make a top, and, to measure the amplitude of a possible movement.

http://stockcharts.com/school/doku.php?id=chart_school:technical_indicators:relative_strength_index_rsi

RSI - (Relative Strength Index) - Developed J. Welles Wilder, the Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of price movements. RSI oscillates between zero and 100. Traditionally, and according to Wilder, RSI is considered overbought when above 70 and oversold when below 30. Signals can also be generated by looking for divergences, failure swings and centerline crossovers. RSI can also be used to identify the general trend.
Logged

Dr PennyStock
Dr PennyStock
Administrator
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 26758



WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2016, 03:44:54 PM »

ADX - Average Directional Index. I use it to find out possible support and resistance points, because when these lines touch each other(ADX, +DI or -DI), sometimes they bounce to opposite sides, causing bounces or tops. This one is my second most important indicator.

http://stockcharts.com/school/doku.php?id=chart_school:technical_indicators:average_directional_index_adx

ADX - (Average Directional Index) - The Average Directional Index (ADX), Minus Directional Indicator (-DI) and Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) represent a group of directional movement indicators that form a trading system developed by Welles Wilder. Wilder designed ADX with commodities and daily prices in mind, but these indicators can also be applied to stocks. The Average Directional Index (ADX) measures trend strength without regard to trend direction. The other two indicators, Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI), complement ADX by defining trend direction. Used together, chartists can determine both the direction and strength of the trend.

 

Logged

Dr PennyStock
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.083 seconds with 25 queries. (Pretty URLs adds 0.011s, 2q)